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Massive NYPD Shakeup Underway; Top Chiefs Being Fired

The following is via Breaking911.com

A massive shakeup inside the NYPD is underway.

Most notable is the 3 star Chiefs that are being forced out. They include: Thomas P. Purtell, Chief of citywide operations; Joanne Jaffe, chief of community affairs; Joseph Fox, chief of transit; Diana Pizzuti, chief of personnel.

The 4 chiefs were reportedly called into the Police Commissioners office and given the news on Monday afternoon.

In an interesting twist of events, the standard unwritten rule is when told of being replaced, upper brass normally retire. Sources confirm to Breaking911.com that the four 3 star chiefs have refused to retire and may be moved to other areas of the department while retaining their ranks.

Additionally, as many as 60 high-ranking brass will be shuffled around the department. The phone calls informing the individuals will begin later Wednesday evening.

There will be many promotions this coming Friday as well. What exactly triggered the shakeup was not immediately known.

NYPD Commissioner James P. O’Neill confirmed a dozen changes at the executive staff level as part of the department’s continuing operational shift toward Neighborhood Policing, its revolutionary crime-reduction philosophy.

“By driving crime and violence down to levels New York City has not seen in nearly seven decades, we achieved in 2017 what many thought was unimaginable,” Commissioner O’Neill said. “Instead of taking comfort in this achievement, we have a redoubled sense of urgency. We must make every neighborhood safe, at all times. To accomplish this, we have to complete the transformation of the NYPD, which we can only do in partnership with all the people of New York.”

As of January 2018, the new Neighborhood Policing model is in place in 56 of 77 precincts and all nine Housing commands.

“That left 21 more precincts, 12 Transit Districts and many other units within the department yet to go,” Commissioner O’Neill said. “At the same time, we must advance much further in changing our basic organizational systems – such as training, technology, and human resources practices, among others – to support, to the very best of our ability, the hardworking men and women of this department who put their lives on the line every day for the rest of us.” 

Effective as of promotion next week:

Chief of Patrol Terence Monahan will become Chief of Department, the NYPD’s highest-uniformed rank.

A Bronx native, Chief Monahan joined the NYPD in January 1982 and began his career on patrol in the 41st Precinct. He later served as executive officer of the 34th Precinct, as well as commanding officer of the 34th, 46th and 48thPrecincts, and of Narcotics Borough Manhattan North. Chief Monahan also served as executive officer of Patrol Borough Bronx and the Office of the Chief of Department. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts from Fordham University.

“Like Terry’s predecessor, Carlos Gomez, the next Chief of Department has to be someone who is a proven crime-fighter, while fully understanding the potential of Neighborhood Policing,” Commissioner O’Neill said. “As one of the principal designers of this model of policing, Terry is uniquely qualified for this new assignment.”

Other executive staff appointments, effective as of promotion next week, include:

Assistant Chief Rodney Harrison, current executive officer of the Patrol Services Bureau and leader of the bureau’s Neighborhood Policing implementation, will become Chief of Patrol. Assistant Chief Harrison began his career with the NYPD as a police cadet in June 1991. A year later, he became a police officer and patrolled the 114th Precinct. He later worked in the Narcotics Division, various commands in Patrol Borough Brooklyn South and Patrol Borough Brooklyn North, Patrol Borough Bronx, and the Internal Affairs Bureau. He served as executive officer of the 28th and 47th Precincts, Patrol Borough Staten Island and Patrol Borough Brooklyn North. He has also served as commanding officer of the 28th and 32nd Precincts, an Internal Affairs Bureau sub-unit, and Detective Borough Brooklyn North.

Assistant Chief Edward Delatorre, current commanding officer of Patrol Borough Staten Island, will become Chief of the Transit Bureau. Assistant Chief Delatorre began his career with the NYPD in November 1979 and worked in various commands in Patrol Borough Bronx. He later served as executive officer in the Office of the Chief of Department, the Patrol Services Bureau, Patrol Borough Bronx, Patrol Borough Manhattan North, the Housing Bureau, and the Community Affairs Bureau. He has also served as commanding officer of the 42nd and 43rd Precincts, and the Police Academy.

Deputy Chief Nilda Irizarry Hofmann, current executive officer of the Risk Management Bureau, will become Chief of Community Affairs and the first Hispanic woman in the NYPD promoted to three-star chief. Deputy Chief Hofmann began her career with the NYPD in October 1987 as a police administrative aide. Three years later, she became a police officer and worked in various commands in Patrol Borough Bronx and Patrol Borough Manhattan North. She has served as executive officer of the 42nd Precinct, and as commanding officer of the 25th and 52nd Precincts.

Assistant Chief Harry Wedin, current commanding officer of the Special Operations Division, will become Chief of Special Operations. Due to reorganization, the position of Chief of Citywide Operations is abolished. Assistant Chief Wedin began his career with the NYPD in January 1981 and worked in various commands in Patrol Borough Brooklyn South. He later served as executive officer of the Special Operations Division, and as commanding officer of the 67th and 72ndPrecincts, Strategic Response Group 3, the Operations Division, and the Special Operations Division.

Assistant Chief Theresa Shortell, current commanding officer of the Police Academy, will become Chief of Training. Due to reorganization, the position of Deputy Commissioner of Training is abolished. Assistant Chief Shortell began her career with the NYPD in July 1984 and worked in various commands in Patrol Borough Queens South and Patrol Borough Queens North; the Narcotics Division; the Organized Crime Control Bureau; the New York Drug Enforcement Task Force; and the Internal Affairs Bureau. She served as executive officer of the 105th Precinct, and as commanding officer of Transit Bureau District 20; the 6th and 94th Precincts; the Special Victims Division; and the Gang Division.

Chief William Morris, current commanding officer of Patrol Borough Manhattan South, will become Chief of Personnel. Chief Morris began his career with the NYPD in July 1981 and has served in various commands in Patrol Borough Queens South; Patrol Borough Queens North; Patrol Borough Bronx; the Legal Bureau; the Organized Crime Control Bureau; the Narcotics Division; the Central Investigations Division; the Special Victims Division; the Internal Affairs Bureau; and the Police Commissioner’s Office. He also served as executive officer of the Criminal Justice Bureau, and as commanding officer of the 45th, 105th and 113th Precincts, and of the Criminal Justice Bureau.

Assistant Chief John Donohue, currently assigned to the Police Commissioner’s Office, will become Chief of Strategic Initiatives. Due to reorganization, the position of Chief of Management Analysis and Planning is abolished. Assistant Chief Donohue began his career with the NYPD in August 1987 as a police cadet. About two years later, he became a police officer and patrolled the 52nd Precinct. He later served in various commands in Patrol Borough Manhattan North and Patrol Borough Bronx. He served as executive officer of the Intelligence Bureau, and as commanding officer of the Office of Management Analysis and Planning.

Inspector Fausto Pichardo, current commanding officer of the 43rd Precinct, will be promoted to Assistant Chief and become executive officer of the Patrol Services Bureau. Inspector Pichardo began his career with the NYPD in July 1997 as a police cadet. He became a police officer two years later and patrolled the Midtown North Precinct. He later worked in various commands in Patrol Borough Manhattan North, and the Office of the Deputy Commissioner of Public Information. He served as executive officer of the 28th Precinct, and as commanding officer of the 33rd Precinct.

Deputy Chief Stephen Hughes, current commanding officer of the Strategic Response Group, will become Assistant Chief and commanding officer of Patrol Borough Manhattan South. Deputy Chief Hughes began his career with the NYPD in January 1981 and worked in various commands in Patrol Borough Manhattan South and Patrol Borough Manhattan North. He has served as executive officer of the Midtown North Precinct, and commanding officer of the 10thPrecinct and the Warrant Section.

Assistant Chief Kenneth Corey, current commanding officer of the First Deputy Commissioner’s Office, will become commanding officer of Patrol Borough Staten Island. Assistant Chief Corey began his career with the NYPD in June 1988 as a police cadet. He became a police officer approximately two years later and worked in various commands in Patrol Borough Brooklyn South, Patrol Borough Manhattan South, Detective Borough Manhattan South, Gang Squad Manhattan South, and the District Attorney Squad-Queens. He was the executive officer of the 72nd Precinct and Patrol Borough Brooklyn South. He was also the commanding officer of sub-units within Patrol Borough Brooklyn South, the Intelligence Bureau, and the Office of the Deputy Commissioner of Intelligence and Counterterrorism. He also commanded the 76th Precinct and the Medical Division.

Deputy Commissioner Tracie Keesee, Ph.D, current head of the Training Bureau, will become the department’s Equity and Inclusion Officer. In the executive ranks of captain and above during the last four years, the NYPD has increased the number of Hispanics by 15.3%, blacks by 53.8%, and Asians by 130%; women in these ranks increased by 36.5%. “Today, I am establishing an Office of Equity and Inclusion to help continue our progress in this regard,” Commissioner O’Neill said. “This office will monitor diversity within bureaus, divisions and borough commands, and help develop strong women and minority candidates to assume positions of leadership throughout the department. This is essential to creating and sustaining our partnership with New Yorkers, and making the NYPD reflect the community we serve.” Deputy Commissioner Keesee joined the NYPD in February 2016 after working as project director at the National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice – a federal initiative that provided training to law enforcement on bias reduction and procedural fairness. Prior to that, she helped start the Center for Policing Equity, which used research to create strategies to develop closer ties between law enforcement and communities. Previously, she served for 25 years as a uniformed member of the Denver Police Department.

Executive Director Maria Otero will become Assistant Commissioner and remain in her current assignment at the Office of the Deputy Commissioner of Administration. Executive Director Otero joined the NYPD in June 1992 as a police administrative aide and served in various commands, including the 68th Precinct and Patrol Borough Brooklyn South. She also served as executive officer of the Personnel Orders Section, and commanding officer of the Military Extended Leave Desk.

In addition to the 11 uniformed and two civilian promotions listed above, the following four uniformed members of the service will be retiring: Chief of Personnel Diana PizzutiChief of Transit Joseph FoxChief of Community Affairs Joanne Jaffe, and Chief of Citywide Operations Thomas Purtell.

“These men and women have devoted more than a century of service to the NYPD and to the people of this city,” Commissioner James P. O’Neill said. “Each of them has tirelessly contributed their very best efforts to help bring about the massive crime reductions of the last few decades. We thank them for this, knowing their great talents will continue to bring them much success.”

Source: Breaking911.com

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